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New guidelines for archiving personal data

National Archives - Mon, 08/20/2018 - 06:18

The National Archives today has published a new set of guidelines for archiving personal data.

The rules for handling information about living people in archives and records intended for transfer to archive services changed on 25 May 2018. The Data Protection Act 1998 was replaced by The Data Protection Act 2018 (DPA 2018). This is as a result of new legislation in the EU: the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). The DPA 2018 makes additional provisions around areas not covered by GDPR. In general, ‘archiving’ which complied with the 1998 Data Protection Act will continue to be permitted under the new law and no major changes are required.

Malcolm Todd, Head of Information Policy at The National Archives said:

“History and all sorts of research cannot be done without information about people.  Archivists have been trusted to manage personal data carefully for generations.  The new Guide focuses on how this works in the age of the cloud and social media.”

Archives services sit in many different types of organisations – galleries, libraries, schools and museums as well as voluntary and community organisations. They are the homes for our collective memory. They help us to understand the past, make sense of the present and guide us for the future.

Reflecting this unique role, there is now greater visibility for archiving in the new data protection law than before. The Guide focuses on the key concepts and their implications in the reformed data protection legal environment around the new concept of archiving in the public interest.  Under this, provided the specified safeguards are met, certain of the other requirements of GDPR and the new DP Act apply in adapted form such as data rectification, storage limitation and initial notification of processing to data subjects.

This guide has been produced in partnership with National Records of Scotland, The Welsh Government, Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, Archives and Records Association (ARA) and National Archives, Ireland under independent chairmanship.

To see the guide, please visit Guide to archiving personal data

The post New guidelines for archiving personal data appeared first on The National Archives.

New guidelines for archiving personal data

National Archives - Mon, 08/20/2018 - 06:18

The National Archives today has published a new set of guidelines for archiving personal data.

The rules for handling information about living people in archives and records intended for transfer to archive services changed on 25 May 2018. The Data Protection Act 1998 was replaced by The Data Protection Act 2018 (DPA 2018). This is as a result of new legislation in the EU: the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). The DPA 2018 makes additional provisions around areas not covered by GDPR. In general, ‘archiving’ which complied with the 1998 Data Protection Act will continue to be permitted under the new law and no major changes are required.

Malcolm Todd, Head of Information Policy at The National Archives said:

“History and all sorts of research cannot be done without information about people. Archivists have been trusted to manage personal data carefully for generations. The new Guide focuses on how this works in the age of the cloud and social media.”

Archives services sit in many different types of organisations – galleries, libraries, schools and museums as well as voluntary and community organisations. They are the homes for our collective memory. They help us to understand the past, make sense of the present and guide us for the future.

Reflecting this unique role, there is now greater visibility for archiving in the new data protection law than before. The Guide focuses on the key concepts and their implications in the reformed data protection legal environment around the new concept of archiving in the public interest. Under this, provided the specified safeguards are met, certain of the other requirements of GDPR and the new DP Act apply in adapted form such as data rectification, storage limitation and initial notification of processing to data subjects.

This guide has been produced in partnership with National Records of Scotland, The Welsh Government, Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, Archives and Records Association (ARA) and National Archives, Ireland under independent chairmanship.

To see the guide, please visit Guide to archiving personal data

The post New guidelines for archiving personal data appeared first on The National Archives.

Updating our Statement of Public Task

National Archives - Tue, 08/07/2018 - 11:42

The National Archives has published a revised version of our Statement of Public Task.

Statements of Public Task are a key part of the transparency requirement on public bodies under the law governing the re-use of public sector information. It is good practice for organisations to regularly review their Statement of Public Task. It is also important to publish the Statement of Public Task, for public scrutiny as well as comment and challenge.

John Sheridan, Digital Director at The National Archives, said:

‘In this update, we have taken the opportunity to clarify in more detail the basis on which we make digital surrogates available for re-use. A digital surrogate of a public record is a representation of that record, usually a photographic image, stored in digital form. Our revised Statement of Public Task makes it clear that digital surrogates are outside our public task where the digitisation has been funded by a third party, and the purpose of the digitisation was to widen access to the collection or to achieve a commercial return for The National Archives.’

If you have any comments about our revised Statement of Public Task, please contact us.

The post Updating our Statement of Public Task appeared first on The National Archives.

Updating our Statement of Public Task

National Archives - Tue, 08/07/2018 - 11:42

The National Archives has published a revised version of our Statement of Public Task.

Statements of Public Task are a key part of the transparency requirement on public bodies under the law governing the re-use of public sector information. It is good practice for organisations to regularly review their Statement of Public Task. It is also important to publish the Statement of Public Task, for public scrutiny as well as comment and challenge.

John Sheridan, Digital Director at The National Archives, said:

‘In this update, we have taken the opportunity to clarify in more detail the basis on which we make digital surrogates available for re-use. A digital surrogate of a public record is a representation of that record, usually a photographic image, stored in digital form. Our revised Statement of Public Task makes it clear that digital surrogates are outside our public task where the digitisation has been funded by a third party, and the purpose of the digitisation was to widen access to the collection or to achieve a commercial return for The National Archives.’

If you have any comments about our revised Statement of Public Task, please contact us.

The post Updating our Statement of Public Task appeared first on The National Archives.

Archives Revealed awards first Scoping Grants

National Archives - Tue, 08/07/2018 - 08:32

The first five successful applicants to the Archives Revealed Scoping Grants programme have been announced.

The scheme, which is supported by The National Archives, The Pilgrim Trust, the Wolfson Foundation and the Foyle Foundation, has awarded grants of up to £3,000 to five archives across the UK.

Val Johnson, Director of Research and Collections at The National Archives, said:

“The Scoping Grants scheme is designed to provide support for archives to improve the understanding and accessibility of their collections. We are delighted to announce the first five recipients from our new Scoping Grant programme, which will result in archives producing better plans for the development of collections, conducting robust preparation for further work on archive material, and opening up new research possibilities for the wider public.”

The first scoping grants have been awarded to Alexandra Park and Palace Charitable Trust, Society of Antiquaries of London, Morrab Library, Centre for Buckinghamshire Studies, and Leonard Cheshire. Further information about each scoping grant project.

The Scoping Grants scheme is a rolling programme with assessments taking place four times per year. Further details about the scheme.

The post Archives Revealed awards first Scoping Grants appeared first on The National Archives.

Archives Revealed awards first Scoping Grants

National Archives - Tue, 08/07/2018 - 08:32

The first five successful applicants to the Archives Revealed Scoping Grants programme have been announced.

The scheme, which is supported by The National Archives, The Pilgrim Trust, the Wolfson Foundation and the Foyle Foundation, has awarded grants of up to £3,000 to five archives across the UK.

Val Johnson, Director of Research and Collections at The National Archives, said:

“The Scoping Grants scheme is designed to provide support for archives to improve the understanding and accessibility of their collections. We are delighted to announce the first five recipients from our new Scoping Grant programme, which will result in archives producing better plans for the development of collections, conducting robust preparation for further work on archive material, and opening up new research possibilities for the wider public.”

The first scoping grants have been awarded to Alexandra Park and Palace Charitable Trust, Society of Antiquaries of London, Morrab Library, Centre for Buckinghamshire Studies, and Leonard Cheshire. Further information about each scoping grant project.

The Scoping Grants scheme is a rolling programme with assessments taking place four times per year. Further details about the scheme.

The post Archives Revealed awards first Scoping Grants appeared first on The National Archives.

How to Define A Successful Synagogue and Other Practices of Activism

The Devil's Tale - Thu, 08/02/2018 - 13:00

Post contributed by William R. Benner, Assistant Professor in the Department of English, Speech, and Foreign Languages at Texas Woman’s University, a recipient of a 2018 Marshall T. Meyer Research Travel Grant.

“Bet-el pamphlet 1984”, Marshall T. Meyer Papers, Box 14, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.

How do we fight for truth and justice in a market driven present? This is an ethical question that is central to my current research on the post-dictatorship generation’s brand of activism in the Southern Cone and it is a question that drew me to the Marshall T. Meyer papers in the Human Rights Archive housed in the David M. Rubenstein Rare Book and Manuscript Library at Duke University. My trip was made possible by a generous Marshall T. Meyer Research Travel Grant. I would like to thank Patrick Stawski and Eric Meyers for their expertise and enthusiasm in my research. I would also like to thank the staff at the Rubenstein and Perkins Libraries for their professionalism.

After a week of diving into the Marshall T. Meyer and the Abraham Joshua Heschel archives, I began to notice a curious difference between Heschel’s and Meyer’s usage of synagogue pamphlets. While Heschel’s pamphlets emphasize the progressive vision of Jewish life within the current cultural, philosophical and political atmosphere, Meyer’s Bet El pamphlets include a wider range of local and international political and cultural topics. Further, Bet El’s pamphlets were clearly written for adolescents as there is a section at the back that asks the youth about a variety of topics. Interestingly, Meyer even included advertising for local companies whose employees supported the synagogue.  When asked in the magazine Nueva presencia about the success of the Bet El synagogue during the repressive military dictatorship in Buenos Aires (1976-1983), Marshall Meyer responded by insisting “éxito” or “success” was an inappropriate term to describe the growth of Bet El. He explained that the term is used for commercial reasons and puts synagogues in competition with each other. Instead, Meyer states that it is the congregation’s collective search for an authentic spiritual identity that has encouraged the community to grow.

“Bet-el pamphlet 1984”, Marshall T. Meyer Papers, Box 14, David M. Rubenstein Rare Book & Manuscript Library, Duke University.

I am currently working on an article examining Meyer’s use of pamphlets to distribute his progressive vision of religious activism. Meyer’s ‘success’ and his discomfort with the notion of commercial success is a conflict that I observe in the recent artistic productions by the post-dictatorship generation in Argentina. For example, in the blog Diario de una princesa montonera, the author and child of the disappeared Mariana Eva Perez confesses “Luchás por la identidad y la justicia y al mismo tiempo acumulás millas/ You fight for truth and justice and at the same time you accumulate [frequent flyer] miles”. Perez, like Meyer before her, struggles with the idea that she is in some way profiting off of the suffering of others. In the future, I hope to incorporate my archival work on Marshall T. Meyer in a larger book project that will attempt to articulate different practices of human rights activism during and after the last dictatorship in Argentina and how these practices addressed the ethical issue of ‘success’.

 

 

The post How to Define A Successful Synagogue and Other Practices of Activism appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

Maintenance work on our website, Sunday 5 August 08:00-12:00

National Archives - Wed, 08/01/2018 - 11:40

We will be carrying out essential maintenance work from 08:00 to 12:00 on Sunday 5 August. We anticipate that all our online and web services will be disrupted during this time.

We expect the work to be completed by 12:00, when all our online services are scheduled to be available once more.

We apologise for any inconvenience caused.

The post Maintenance work on our website, Sunday 5 August 08:00-12:00 appeared first on The National Archives.

What You Can Do Yourself: Home Health Guides in the History of Medicine

The Devil's Tale - Fri, 07/27/2018 - 10:00
“Methods of Applying Water” from New Curative Treatments of Disease… vol. 1, (1901) Fig. 1 – Exercising in a cold bath, Fig. 2 – Nasal douche, Fig. 3 – Foot bath, Fig. 4 – Head bath

What is that rash? What should you do if you have a snakebite? Are carrots really good for one’s health? What does chicken pox look like?

Long before WebMD and other online tools existed, popular medicine guides were created and consulted to answer such questions. In the United States, there is a long tradition of such home health guides designed to help the common person diagnose and treat illnesses. These guides, often physician-approved and authored, included ways to prevent illness and injury while offering instructions and remedies.

Home health guides offered laypeople (assuming they could read) information on a range of topics: basic anatomy, symptoms of illnesses, exercises for good health, “cures” by water or electricity, sexual education, and much more. These popular medicine guides continued well into the twentieth century with works like Our Bodies, Our Selves. Such works are still printed today in the digital age.

An exhibit featuring a sample of these popular medicine guides from our History of Medicine Collections is currently on display. You can visit the exhibit What You Can Do Yourself: Home Health Guides in the History of Medicine in the Josiah Charles Trent History of Medicine Room from July 24 – October 13, 2018.

Health Knowledge : A Thorough and Concise Knowledge of the Prevention, Causes, and Treatments of Disease, Simplified for Home Use, vol. 2, (1921).

The post What You Can Do Yourself: Home Health Guides in the History of Medicine appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

“Why Are You Constantly Harassing Us on the Street?”

The Devil's Tale - Wed, 07/25/2018 - 10:00

Post contributed by Molly Brookfield, a Ph.D. candidate in the departments of History and Women’s Studies at the University of Michigan. She is writing a dissertation about the history of sexual harassment in public places in the United States. Her research at the Sallie Bingham Center was generously funded with a Mary Lily Research Grant.

Imagine you are a young woman walking down the street on a sunny summer day in New York City. The sidewalk is crowded with people and you are thinking about the day ahead. You’re so absorbed in your thoughts that the shouted remark from a fellow passer-by jolts you unpleasantly back to your surroundings. The remark comes from a man who is also hurrying down the sidewalk. Maybe he shouts, “Looking good, honey!” or “How’s it going, sweetheart?” The specifics of the remark aren’t what’s important; it’s enough to know that he’s tried to grab your attention in a loud and public way that has startled you and forced you to acknowledge his presence. Annoyed, you turn to face the man, reach into your bag, and grab hold of a stack of cards you’ve had made for this occasion. You hand a card to the catcaller, and his eyebrows arch as he reads the first lines: “Brother, I feel insulted and oppressed by your comment. You and men like you make it unpleasant and difficult for all of us women, including your mothers, sisters and daughters, to leave our houses alone. Why are you constantly harassing us on the street?”

This was the tactic taken by New York feminist Marigold Arnold in 1971. That summer, Arnold handed mimeographed cards to men who harassed her in the street and the Women’s Health and Abortion Project published the full text in their newsletter—which is where I found it, while visiting the Sallie Bingham Center on a Mary Lily Research Grant. According to her mimeographed card, Arnold wanted men who catcalled to know that they “interrupt … [women’s] train of thought when we are walking alone, acting as though simply because you are a male we will be honored by your talking to us.” But Arnold was adamant, “We don’t feel honored.” In distinctly 1970s-flavored rhetoric, Arnold’s card declares, “The road of true liberation for all people is for each of us to struggle against oppressing our brothers and sisters. No more oppressive comments to women on the street.”

Arnold’s mimeographed statement was just one way that New York women resisted sexual harassment on the street in the 1970s. The New York Radical Feminists (NYRF) had a Street Harassment Committee that held self-defense workshops. Women raised awareness of street harassment with poems, stories, and cartoons in the group’s newsletter (see image). In 1976, members organized a Women’s Walk Against Rape, similar to the more recent Take Back the Night marches. When one of their members was harassed in Zabar’s, a deli on Broadway, the NYRF even started a blacklist of New York businesses where male employees harassed women.

These documents illustrate that women have experienced sexual harassment in public places since at least the 1970s (and my dissertation will show it has been a problem for much longer). While the New York Radical Feminists did not completely succeed in eradicating street harassment, their work can be viewed as a precursor and inspiration to groups like Hollaback! or Stop Street Harassment, work that is increasingly relevant as we continue to grapple with the pervasiveness of sexual harassment in American society.

All materials cited here can be found in the New York Radical Feminists Records, Box 1 at the Sallie Bingham Center for Women’s History and Culture.

The post “Why Are You Constantly Harassing Us on the Street?” appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

Newly accredited archive services

National Archives - Tue, 07/24/2018 - 05:09

The UK Archive Service Accreditation Partnership is pleased to announce that a further 17 archive services have been awarded accredited status as a recent  Archive Service Accreditation Panel. The successful archive services are:

  • Bolton Archives and Local Studies Service
  • Bromley Archives
  • Bury Archives and Local History Service
  • Centre for Buckinghamshire Studies
  • Dudley Archives and Local History Service
  • Durham County Record Office
  • Essex Record Office
  • Kent Archive Service
  • North East Lincolnshire Archives
  • Northumberland Archives
  • Public Record Office of Northern Ireland
  • Stockport Local Heritage Library
  • Tameside Local Studies and Archives
  • Teesside Archives
  • University of Liverpool Library Special Collections and Archives
  • Wallace Collection
  • West Sussex Record Office

The archive services demonstrated that they have achieved UK national standards relating to management and resourcing; the care of unique collections and the service offer to their entire range of users.

See the full list of accredited archive services.

Find out more about Archive Service Accreditation.

The post Newly accredited archive services appeared first on The National Archives.

Newly accredited archive services

National Archives - Tue, 07/24/2018 - 05:09

The UK Archive Service Accreditation Partnership is pleased to announce that a further 17 archive services have been awarded accredited status as a recent Archive Service Accreditation Panel. The successful archive services are:

  • Bolton Archives and Local Studies Service
  • Bromley Archives
  • Bury Archives and Local History Service
  • Centre for Buckinghamshire Studies
  • Dudley Archives and Local History Service
  • Durham County Record Office
  • Essex Record Office
  • Kent Archive Service
  • North East Lincolnshire Archives
  • Northumberland Archives
  • Public Record Office of Northern Ireland
  • Stockport Local Heritage Library
  • Tameside Local Studies and Archives
  • Teesside Archives
  • University of Liverpool Library Special Collections and Archives
  • Wallace Collection
  • West Sussex Record Office

The archive services demonstrated that they have achieved UK national standards relating to management and resourcing; the care of unique collections and the service offer to their entire range of users.

See the full list of accredited archive services.

Find out more about Archive Service Accreditation.

The post Newly accredited archive services appeared first on The National Archives.

Prime Minister’s papers from 1993 released

National Archives - Tue, 07/24/2018 - 04:00

A photograph of workers planning the reconstruction of Windsor Castle after the fire in November 1992 (catalogue reference: PREM 19/4170)

We have released files from the Prime Minister’s Office and Cabinet Office predominantly covering the year of 1993.

The newly released Cabinet Office files (CAB and PREM) shed light on a range of subjects both at home and abroad under John Major’s leadership.

The files are available to view in the public reading rooms at The National Archives, Kew.

A selection of files have been digitised and can be viewed and downloaded using our catalogue, Discovery.

You can also find out more about our previous file releases.

The post Prime Minister’s papers from 1993 released appeared first on The National Archives.

Prime Minister’s papers from 1993 released

National Archives - Tue, 07/24/2018 - 04:00

A photograph of workers planning the reconstruction of Windsor Castle after the fire in November 1992 (catalogue reference: PREM 19/4170)

We have released files from the Prime Minister’s Office and Cabinet Office predominantly covering the year of 1993.

The newly released Cabinet Office files (CAB and PREM) shed light on a range of subjects both at home and abroad under John Major’s leadership.

The files are available to view in the public reading rooms at The National Archives, Kew.

A selection of files have been digitised and can be viewed and downloaded using our catalogue, Discovery.

You can also find out more about our previous file releases.

The post Prime Minister’s papers from 1993 released appeared first on The National Archives.

Nature’s Remedy: “All Druggists Sell the Dainty 25 Cents Box”

The Devil's Tale - Mon, 07/23/2018 - 10:13

Post contributed by Erin Rutherford, Josiah Charles Trent History of Medicine Intern, 2017-2018

In early 1900s America, an individual seeking relief from myriad ailments could choose from myriad purported treatments. When looking to cure “indigestion, bad breath, loss of appetite, sick headache, and rheumatism,”[1] one could turn to an array of syrups, lozenges, tonics, or tablets. One such product, extremely popular for several decades, was Nature’s Remedy.

The man behind Nature’s Remedy, Augustus Henry Lewis, began his pharmaceutical career as a pharmacist in Bolivar, Missouri. Teaming up with his nephew James Howe, Lewis moved his company to St. Louis in 1901, soon becoming the A.H. Lewis Medicine Co.

Nature’s Remedy patent medicine tin. History of Medicine Artifacts Collection, 1550-1980s. Beyer Family Collection Artifacts, 18th century-circa 1935. Received from Dr. and Mrs. Emil C. Beyer. Box 8, Item hbeyer0031.

Tin boxes filled with Nature’s Remedy churned out of the factory. By 1906, the business had grown so much that it moved into “a handsome new building at the corner of Fourth and Spruce Streets.”[2]

 

Identifier MM0227 Mother Nature – as Health’s Guardian. 1923. Medicine and Madison Avenue, Digital Collection. John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History

 

Advertising campaigns described Nature’s Remedy as “Mother Nature in a pleasant, helpful form – all vegetable and a skillful blend of her own plan of insuring health.”[3] Slightly more descriptive circulars referred to the product as a vegetable preparation that “act[ed] on the stomach, liver, kidneys, and bowels.”[4] Marketing was so rigorous that the company enlisted a composer to produce a tune to popularize Nature’s Remedy. The first chorus from the 1928 sheet music, purchased to be played at home on a ukulele or banjo, reads as follows: “No matter whether you have wealth, Just as long as you have health, You ‘feel like a million!’ If you just wear a great big smile, You are in the latest style, You ‘feel like a million’ But when you wear a frown, And your health is run down, You feel bad, you look sad, At the whole world you are mad! And then you follow nature’s course, Banish all of that remorse, You ‘feel like a million!’”[5]

Item ID AAA7481, Nature’s Remedy digestive aid tablets, Dentyne gum, Doran’s Coffee, Loveland (4 advertisements). Foster & Keisler (Placement Company). Outdoor Advertising Association of America (OAAA) Archives, 1885-1990s. [1900s-1910s].

Item ID BBB4564, Wheat, Cigarettes, Gasene Naphita Soap, Natures Remedy Tablets, Fatima Cigarettes, Fatima Cigarettes, Adams Black Jack Chewing Gum, unknown, Holsum Bread (9 advertisements). Foster & Keisler (Placement Company). Outdoor Advertising Association of America (OAAA) Archives, 1885-1990s. Undated.

What ingredients did these tablets contain? A chemical analysis conducted on the product in 1923 by the Journal of the American Medical Association showed the presence of burdock, juniper berries, sarsaparilla, mandrake, rhubarb, dandelion, prickly ash, aloes, cascara, and Belladonna root.[6] A write up in JAMA went on to delicately allude to its effects: “The manufacturers of these tablets direct the purchaser to take one every night for a week. They very kindly allow the sufferer (from the effect of the tablets) a few days to recuperate and then suggest that the week of torment be repeated and if this is survived, another few days of rest is allowed before another round of torture and so on ‘until the bowels become strong enough to do their work.’”[7]

Whether of the belief that the product was a nostrum, a placebo, a bonafide cure, or a temporary comfort, the list of contents – and Mr. Clark’s description – make the purpose of the pill clear: It was a cathartic mixture, a purgative, a laxative.

Although some may read the remedy itself as cause for a sour stomach, there is something rather kismet in this tale. Under the full leadership of Mr. Howe, the same “handsome” factory went on to manufacture one of America’s leading brands of antacid tablets.

[1] A.H. Clark, “Nature’s Remedy Tablets,” JAMA: Journal of the American Medical Association, March 1919. Quoted in American Medical Association, Propaganda Department, Miscellaneous Nostrums, 5th edition (Chicago: American Medical Association, 1923), 63.

[2] “A. H. Lewis Medicine Co. Outgrew Its Building,” The Pharmaceutical Era (35), 6 (1906), 639.

[3] Identifier MM0227 Mother Nature – as Health’s Guardian. 1923. Medicine and Madison Avenue, Digital Collection, John W. Hartman Center for Sales, Advertising & Marketing History. Retrieved from https://repository.duke.edu/dc/mma/MM0227

[4] American Medical Association, Propaganda Department, Miscellaneous Nostrums, 63.

[5] Waldon, W. Feel Like a Million. St. Louis, Mo.: A. H. Lewis Medicine Co., 1928. Print.

[6] American Medical Association, Propaganda Department, Miscellaneous Nostrums, 64.

[7] Ibid., 65.

The post Nature’s Remedy: “All Druggists Sell the Dainty 25 Cents Box” appeared first on The Devil's Tale.

Read our annual report and accounts 2017-18

National Archives - Fri, 07/20/2018 - 04:21

The 15th annual report and accounts for The National Archives are now available online, where you can read about our highlights during 2017-18.

This year’s annual report marks the third year of challenges and achievements for Archives Inspire, our ambitious, audience-focused strategy.

Read more in the full report.

The post Read our annual report and accounts 2017-18 appeared first on The National Archives.

Read our annual report and accounts 2017-18

National Archives - Fri, 07/20/2018 - 04:21

The 15th annual report and accounts for The National Archives are now available online, where you can read about our highlights during 2017-18.

This year’s annual report marks the third year of challenges and achievements for Archives Inspire, our ambitious, audience-focused strategy.

Read more in the full report.

The post Read our annual report and accounts 2017-18 appeared first on The National Archives.

Website maintenance on 18 July at 07:00

National Archives - Tue, 07/17/2018 - 09:45

We will be carrying out essential website maintenance at 07:00 on Wednesday 18 July. Our website and Discovery will be unavailable while it takes place.

We expect the work to be completed by 07:30. We apologise for any inconvenience caused.

The post Website maintenance on 18 July at 07:00 appeared first on The National Archives.

Research priorities at The National Archives

National Archives - Mon, 07/16/2018 - 04:00

The National Archives has launched five cross-cutting research priorities, as it responds to some of the biggest opportunities and challenges it faces as an archive.

With over 11 million records in our collection and an increasing number of digital records accessioned each year, The National Archives’ research priorities place the shift to digital at the centre of our research interests and challenges as we seek to innovate our practice and unlock our collections to reach new audiences.

The research priorities aim to uncover new methodologies, theories and technologies in five core areas:

  • Rethinking the record
  • People, place and rule
  • Risk, uncertainty and trust
  • Openness, access and use
  • Impact, value and affect

Dr Anna Sexton, Head of Research at The National Archives, said:

‘We would like to work collaboratively across disciplines and sectors to respond to these research challenges. Bringing together the skills of the historian, archivist, conservator, digital humanist and computer scientist (to name but a few), we hope to innovate around the archive and transform practice and public understanding.’

Find out more about the research priorities.

Get in touch with the research team to explore research collaboration opportunities.

The post Research priorities at The National Archives appeared first on The National Archives.

Research priorities at The National Archives

National Archives - Mon, 07/16/2018 - 04:00

The National Archives has launched five cross-cutting research priorities, as it responds to some of the biggest opportunities and challenges it faces as an archive.

With over 11 million records in our collection and an increasing number of digital records accessioned each year, The National Archives’ research priorities place the shift to digital at the centre of our research interests and challenges as we seek to innovate our practice and unlock our collections to reach new audiences.

The research priorities aim to uncover new methodologies, theories and technologies in five core areas:

  • Rethinking the record
  • People, place and rule
  • Risk, uncertainty and trust
  • Openness, access and use
  • Impact, value and affect

Dr Anna Sexton, Head of Research at The National Archives, said:

‘We would like to work collaboratively across disciplines and sectors to respond to these research challenges. Bringing together the skills of the historian, archivist, conservator, digital humanist and computer scientist (to name but a few), we hope to innovate around the archive and transform practice and public understanding.’

Find out more about the research priorities.

Get in touch with the research team to explore research collaboration opportunities.

The post Research priorities at The National Archives appeared first on The National Archives.

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