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Jeff James appointed International Forum President

Thu, 09/20/2018 - 11:26

Chief Executive and Keeper of The National Archives, Jeff James, has been appointed President of the Forum of National Archivists (FAN), the international forum for national archivists. Jeff will also join the International Council on Archives’ (ICA) Executive Board and its Programme Commission, where he will represent the views of national archivists.

The National Archives is a prestigious national institution with an international reputation for excellence. Jeff has overall responsibility for the future direction and current performance, and provides visible and inspirational strategic leadership to more than 500 staff. Jeff spent six years as Director of Operations of The National Archives, and successfully led the institution’s strategic development and operational delivery.

The National Archives leads the UK archive sector, and provides inspiration, advocacy and support for archive services in England. In March 2017, Jeff oversaw the development and co-creation of an ambitious vision and action plan for the sector Archives Unlocked.

The ICA is a neutral, non-governmental organisation, funded by 1,900 members from 199 countries and territories. Its aims include advocating for good archival management and the physical protection of recorded heritage, producing reputable standards and best practices, and encouraging dialogue, exchange, and transmission of this knowledge and expertise across national borders.

On hearing of his appointment, Jeff said: ‘I believe that this reflects the international reputation that UK archives have through their wealth of collections and soundness of practice. I will dedicate myself to driving forward FAN’s strategic programme of work, and in realising its wider potential, in greater collaboration with the ICA and key peers in other institutions across the globe.’

The post Jeff James appointed International Forum President appeared first on The National Archives.

Jeff James appointed International Forum President

Thu, 09/20/2018 - 11:26

Chief Executive and Keeper of The National Archives, Jeff James, has been appointed President of the Forum of National Archivists (FAN), the international forum for national archivists. Jeff will also join the International Council on Archives’ (ICA) Executive Board and its Programme Commission, where he will represent the views of national archivists.

The National Archives is a prestigious national institution with an international reputation for excellence. Jeff has overall responsibility for the future direction and current performance, and provides visible and inspirational strategic leadership to more than 500 staff. Jeff spent six years as Director of Operations of The National Archives, and successfully led the institution’s strategic development and operational delivery.

The National Archives leads the UK archive sector, and provides inspiration, advocacy and support for archive services in England. In March 2017, Jeff oversaw the development and co-creation of an ambitious vision and action plan for the sector Archives Unlocked.

The ICA is a neutral, non-governmental organisation, funded by 1,900 members from 199 countries and territories. Its aims include advocating for good archival management and the physical protection of recorded heritage, producing reputable standards and best practices, and encouraging dialogue, exchange, and transmission of this knowledge and expertise across national borders.

On hearing of his appointment, Jeff said: ‘I believe that this reflects the international reputation that UK archives have through their wealth of collections and soundness of practice. I will dedicate myself to driving forward FAN’s strategic programme of work, and in realising its wider potential, in greater collaboration with the ICA and key peers in other institutions across the globe.’

The post Jeff James appointed International Forum President appeared first on The National Archives.

Shakespeare documents recognised at UNESCO ceremony

Thu, 09/20/2018 - 05:38

A ceremony to celebrate the inclusion of 90 Shakespeare documents in UNESCO’s International Memory of the World register has been held in London.

PRO 30/25/205: Shakespeare portrait

Documents created during the lifetime of William Shakespeare and relating to the playwright’s life events, business dealings and legal actions now form part of the register of culturally and historically significant items, artefacts and buildings from across the world, which includes the Egyptian pyramids, the Gutenberg Bible, and the Bayeux Tapestry.

The Shakespeare documents held by The National Archives form the largest collection of its kind and feature nearly half of all known contemporary references to his life – including four of his six known signatures.

Dr Katy Mair, Head of Early Modern Records at The National Archives, said: ‘We are delighted that The National Archives’ documents have been included in the UNESCO International Memory of the World register. Our collection provides a priceless perspective on Shakespeare’s life in London.

‘By inscribing our documents along with those held by institutions both in the UK and abroad we can see the global reach that Shakespeare and his works still has today.’

PROB 1/4: Will of William Shakespeare, 25 March 1616

The successful nomination was led by the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust in partnership with The National Archives, Worcestershire Archives and Archaeology Service, the College of Arms, the British Library and London Metropolitan Archives in the UK, and the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington DC, USA.

The post Shakespeare documents recognised at UNESCO ceremony appeared first on The National Archives.

Shakespeare documents recognised at UNESCO ceremony

Thu, 09/20/2018 - 05:38

A ceremony to celebrate the inclusion of 90 Shakespeare documents in UNESCO’s International Memory of the World register has been held in London.

PRO 30/25/205: Shakespeare portrait

Documents created during the lifetime of William Shakespeare and relating to the playwright’s life events, business dealings and legal actions now form part of the register of culturally and historically significant items, artefacts and buildings from across the world, which includes the Egyptian pyramids, the Gutenberg Bible, and the Bayeux Tapestry.

The Shakespeare documents held by The National Archives form the largest collection of its kind and feature nearly half of all known contemporary references to his life – including four of his six known signatures.

Dr Katy Mair, Head of Early Modern Records at The National Archives, said: ‘We are delighted that The National Archives’ documents have been included in the UNESCO International Memory of the World register. Our collection provides a priceless perspective on Shakespeare’s life in London.

‘By inscribing our documents along with those held by institutions both in the UK and abroad we can see the global reach that Shakespeare and his works still has today.’

PROB 1/4: Will of William Shakespeare, 25 March 1616

The successful nomination was led by the Shakespeare Birthplace Trust in partnership with The National Archives, Worcestershire Archives and Archaeology Service, the College of Arms, the British Library and London Metropolitan Archives in the UK, and the Folger Shakespeare Library in Washington DC, USA.

The post Shakespeare documents recognised at UNESCO ceremony appeared first on The National Archives.

Headline sponsors of DCDC18 announced

Fri, 08/31/2018 - 07:05

We are delighted to announce that Wellcome Collection will be the headline sponsor for DCDC18: Memory and Transformation.

Delivered jointly by The National Archives and Research Libraries UK, the Discovering Collections Discovering Communities (DCDC) conference brings together speakers from across the heritage, cultural, and academic sectors to share their experiences and thoughts on topics ranging from commemoration, digital transformation and how we can all engage with new and diverse audiences.

Simon Chaplin, Director of Culture and Society at Wellcome Trust, and Director of Wellcome Collection said: ‘As a museum and library that aims to challenge how we all think and feel about health Wellcome Collection is pleased to be able to support DCDC18. Breaking down boundaries and bringing new voices to shape our approach are things we care about deeply and DCDC will be a fantastic opportunity to share with and learn from others.’

This year, DCDC will be held at the Birmingham Conference and Events Centre from 19-21 November. There will be a Wellcome Collection session on the afternoon of Tuesday 20 November where artist, activist, academic and Wellcome Engagement Fellow, Lois Weaver, will host a long table discussion on the topic ‘Whose Memories?’ The session will explore questions of absence and exclusion in memory institutions.

For the full conference programme and how to register for your place at the conference, please see the DCDC website.  

Join the conversation on #DCDC18

The post Headline sponsors of DCDC18 announced appeared first on The National Archives.

Headline sponsors of DCDC18 announced

Fri, 08/31/2018 - 07:05

We are delighted to announce that Wellcome Collection will be the headline sponsor for DCDC18: Memory and Transformation.

Delivered jointly by The National Archives and Research Libraries UK, the Discovering Collections Discovering Communities (DCDC) conference brings together speakers from across the heritage, cultural, and academic sectors to share their experiences and thoughts on topics ranging from commemoration, digital transformation and how we can all engage with new and diverse audiences.

Simon Chaplin, Director of Culture and Society at Wellcome Trust, and Director of Wellcome Collection said: ‘As a museum and library that aims to challenge how we all think and feel about health Wellcome Collection is pleased to be able to support DCDC18. Breaking down boundaries and bringing new voices to shape our approach are things we care about deeply and DCDC will be a fantastic opportunity to share with and learn from others.’

This year, DCDC will be held at the Birmingham Conference and Events Centre from 19-21 November. There will be a Wellcome Collection session on the afternoon of Tuesday 20 November where artist, activist, academic and Wellcome Engagement Fellow, Lois Weaver, will host a long table discussion on the topic ‘Whose Memories?’ The session will explore questions of absence and exclusion in memory institutions.

For the full conference programme and how to register for your place at the conference, please see the DCDC website.

Join the conversation on #DCDC18

The post Headline sponsors of DCDC18 announced appeared first on The National Archives.

Workforce development for the archive sector

Wed, 08/29/2018 - 10:50

A team of workers pulls together (catalogue reference: INF 3/125b)

The National Archives has today launched a workforce development strategy for the archive sector. Independent research consultancy Pye Tait was commissioned to create the strategy, which was further developed with the support of Archives Unlocked.

The strategy draws upon extensive dialogue with people from across the archive sector, as well as with a range of funders and partners from the wider culture, heritage and information worlds.

Five strategic objectives to foster a skilled and flexible workforce emerged as a result of roundtable discussions, in-depth interviews and a national workforce survey. The strategy highlights in particular the importance of the archive workforce embracing new digital skills, developing new leaders from within the sector and also tackling the challenging lack of diversity within archives.

Dr Valerie Johnson, Director of Research and Collections at The National Archives, said: “This strategy clearly shows the drive of the sector to embrace change and develop new skills for the challenges of today. We look forward to working with our partners and the Archives Unlocked Board to implement the initiatives highlighted in this strategy and welcome comment and participation from the sector to take forward the strategy together.”

Geoff Pick, former chair of the Archives and Records Association, Director of London Metropolitan Archives and part of the Archives Unlocked board, said: “This strategy is built on the views of the whole sector and I am pleased to see that it addresses the critical issues that all archives are facing, such as diversity and social mobility. The collaborative work in this document opens up new creative pathways for the sector to both recruit new talent and support the professional development of its current workforce.”

Read the Workforce Development Strategy (PDF, 1.3MB)

The post Workforce development for the archive sector appeared first on The National Archives.

Workforce development for the archive sector

Wed, 08/29/2018 - 10:50

A team of workers pulls together (catalogue reference: INF 3/125b)

The National Archives has today launched a workforce development strategy for the archive sector. Independent research consultancy Pye Tait was commissioned to create the strategy, which was further developed with the support of Archives Unlocked.

The strategy draws upon extensive dialogue with people from across the archive sector, as well as with a range of funders and partners from the wider culture, heritage and information worlds.

Five strategic objectives to foster a skilled and flexible workforce emerged as a result of roundtable discussions, in-depth interviews and a national workforce survey. The strategy highlights in particular the importance of the archive workforce embracing new digital skills, developing new leaders from within the sector and also tackling the challenging lack of diversity within archives.

Dr Valerie Johnson, Director of Research and Collections at The National Archives, said: “This strategy clearly shows the drive of the sector to embrace change and develop new skills for the challenges of today. We look forward to working with our partners and the Archives Unlocked Board to implement the initiatives highlighted in this strategy and welcome comment and participation from the sector to take forward the strategy together.”

Geoff Pick, former chair of the Archives and Records Association, Director of London Metropolitan Archives and part of the Archives Unlocked board, said: “This strategy is built on the views of the whole sector and I am pleased to see that it addresses the critical issues that all archives are facing, such as diversity and social mobility. The collaborative work in this document opens up new creative pathways for the sector to both recruit new talent and support the professional development of its current workforce.”

Read the Workforce Development Strategy (PDF, 1.3MB)

The post Workforce development for the archive sector appeared first on The National Archives.

Explore Your Archive, 2018 and beyond

Fri, 08/24/2018 - 07:28

The Archives and Records Association (UK and Ireland) and The National Archives have agreed that, going forward, the Explore Your Archive campaign, as it is now mature and well established as a sector-owned campaign, should be guided solely by the Archives and Records Association in future.  The National Archives will continue to give the campaign strong support through participation and dissemination of information.

Explore Your Archive aims to excite members of the public and engage them with their local public and private archive services. The campaign, with its iconic branding, was created in 2013 and has been overseen jointly since then by the ARA and The National Archives. In that time, it has engaged tens of thousands of people across the UK and Ireland and has supported the development of engagement work by the archives and records sector.

The campaign will continue to run all year round. The 2018 campaign launch week will be 17-25 November. For more information and to register an event, please visit www.archives.org.uk – the campaign website, which is currently being upgraded. You can also contact Jon Elliott at the ARA +44 7587 635402.

The post Explore Your Archive, 2018 and beyond appeared first on The National Archives.

Explore Your Archive, 2018 and beyond

Fri, 08/24/2018 - 07:28

The Archives and Records Association (UK and Ireland) and The National Archives have agreed that, going forward, the Explore Your Archive campaign, as it is now mature and well established as a sector-owned campaign, should be guided solely by the Archives and Records Association in future. The National Archives will continue to give the campaign strong support through participation and dissemination of information.

Explore Your Archive aims to excite members of the public and engage them with their local public and private archive services. The campaign, with its iconic branding, was created in 2013 and has been overseen jointly since then by the ARA and The National Archives. In that time, it has engaged tens of thousands of people across the UK and Ireland and has supported the development of engagement work by the archives and records sector.

The campaign will continue to run all year round. The 2018 campaign launch week will be 17-25 November. For more information and to register an event, please visit www.archives.org.uk – the campaign website, which is currently being upgraded. You can also contact Jon Elliott at the ARA +44 7587 635402.

The post Explore Your Archive, 2018 and beyond appeared first on The National Archives.

New ‘1920s Britain’ education resource

Thu, 08/23/2018 - 07:29

The National Archives Education online team have today added to their resources with the publication of the new two part themed document collection called ‘1920s Britain: Decade of Conflict, realignment and change?’.

1920s Britain is an option taught as part of  the A level history syllabus for key stage 5. The National Archives as the UK government’s archive has a huge range of documents and original source material which bring to life the amount of post-war change which happened in this decade.

The 1920s saw a rapid transformation in British society, almost to the point of fundamentally changing the basis of its political, economic and social organisation even though there was a certain amount of resistance to these changes. They were partly the result of the First World War but also the consequent of social and technical changes in British society which often pre-dated the War but which were amplified in the 1920s by the impact of war.

Clare Horrie, Education Web Manager at The National Archives who curated the resource said: ‘This group of documents will encourage teachers and students to identify questions around key social, economic and political changes in this decade of Britain’s domestic history through exciting new original material not readily found available in standard history text books’.

The resource covers such topics as political parties, the Geddes Axe, the Gold Standard, the General Strike, hunger marches and unemployment, the changing role of women, advances in transport and education policy and so on. All subjects are supported by digital downloadable documents. Learners can read short extracts from Ramsay MacDonald’s diary about the Liberal Party when studying the formation of the first Labour Government in 1924 or see the notes taken by a policeman at the Miners’ Hunger March rally in London in November, 1927. For those interested in the jazz age, there is a Home Office record concerning musician Sidney Bechet’s deportation order in September, 1922.

We hope that the resource will provide teachers and students with the opportunity to expand their understanding of the decade through an exploration of these primary sources supported by an introduction to the period by Professor Keith Laybourn, Huddersfield University.

Visit the 1920s Britain resource

The post New ‘1920s Britain’ education resource appeared first on The National Archives.

New ‘1920s Britain’ education resource

Thu, 08/23/2018 - 07:29

The National Archives Education online team have today added to their resources with the publication of the new two part themed document collection called ‘1920s Britain: Decade of Conflict, realignment and change?’.

1920s Britain is an option taught as part of the A level history syllabus for key stage 5. The National Archives as the UK government’s archive has a huge range of documents and original source material which bring to life the amount of post-war change which happened in this decade.

The 1920s saw a rapid transformation in British society, almost to the point of fundamentally changing the basis of its political, economic and social organisation even though there was a certain amount of resistance to these changes. They were partly the result of the First World War but also the consequent of social and technical changes in British society which often pre-dated the War but which were amplified in the 1920s by the impact of war.

Clare Horrie, Education Web Manager at The National Archives who curated the resource said: ‘This group of documents will encourage teachers and students to identify questions around key social, economic and political changes in this decade of Britain’s domestic history through exciting new original material not readily found available in standard history text books’.

The resource covers such topics as political parties, the Geddes Axe, the Gold Standard, the General Strike, hunger marches and unemployment, the changing role of women, advances in transport and education policy and so on. All subjects are supported by digital downloadable documents. Learners can read short extracts from Ramsay MacDonald’s diary about the Liberal Party when studying the formation of the first Labour Government in 1924 or see the notes taken by a policeman at the Miners’ Hunger March rally in London in November, 1927. For those interested in the jazz age, there is a Home Office record concerning musician Sidney Bechet’s deportation order in September, 1922.

We hope that the resource will provide teachers and students with the opportunity to expand their understanding of the decade through an exploration of these primary sources supported by an introduction to the period by Professor Keith Laybourn, Huddersfield University.

Visit the 1920s Britain resource

The post New ‘1920s Britain’ education resource appeared first on The National Archives.

New guidelines for archiving personal data

Mon, 08/20/2018 - 06:18

The National Archives today has published a new set of guidelines for archiving personal data.

The rules for handling information about living people in archives and records intended for transfer to archive services changed on 25 May 2018. The Data Protection Act 1998 was replaced by The Data Protection Act 2018 (DPA 2018). This is as a result of new legislation in the EU: the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). The DPA 2018 makes additional provisions around areas not covered by GDPR. In general, ‘archiving’ which complied with the 1998 Data Protection Act will continue to be permitted under the new law and no major changes are required.

Malcolm Todd, Head of Information Policy at The National Archives said:

“History and all sorts of research cannot be done without information about people.  Archivists have been trusted to manage personal data carefully for generations.  The new Guide focuses on how this works in the age of the cloud and social media.”

Archives services sit in many different types of organisations – galleries, libraries, schools and museums as well as voluntary and community organisations. They are the homes for our collective memory. They help us to understand the past, make sense of the present and guide us for the future.

Reflecting this unique role, there is now greater visibility for archiving in the new data protection law than before. The Guide focuses on the key concepts and their implications in the reformed data protection legal environment around the new concept of archiving in the public interest.  Under this, provided the specified safeguards are met, certain of the other requirements of GDPR and the new DP Act apply in adapted form such as data rectification, storage limitation and initial notification of processing to data subjects.

This guide has been produced in partnership with National Records of Scotland, The Welsh Government, Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, Archives and Records Association (ARA) and National Archives, Ireland under independent chairmanship.

To see the guide, please visit Guide to archiving personal data

The post New guidelines for archiving personal data appeared first on The National Archives.

New guidelines for archiving personal data

Mon, 08/20/2018 - 06:18

The National Archives today has published a new set of guidelines for archiving personal data.

The rules for handling information about living people in archives and records intended for transfer to archive services changed on 25 May 2018. The Data Protection Act 1998 was replaced by The Data Protection Act 2018 (DPA 2018). This is as a result of new legislation in the EU: the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR). The DPA 2018 makes additional provisions around areas not covered by GDPR. In general, ‘archiving’ which complied with the 1998 Data Protection Act will continue to be permitted under the new law and no major changes are required.

Malcolm Todd, Head of Information Policy at The National Archives said:

“History and all sorts of research cannot be done without information about people. Archivists have been trusted to manage personal data carefully for generations. The new Guide focuses on how this works in the age of the cloud and social media.”

Archives services sit in many different types of organisations – galleries, libraries, schools and museums as well as voluntary and community organisations. They are the homes for our collective memory. They help us to understand the past, make sense of the present and guide us for the future.

Reflecting this unique role, there is now greater visibility for archiving in the new data protection law than before. The Guide focuses on the key concepts and their implications in the reformed data protection legal environment around the new concept of archiving in the public interest. Under this, provided the specified safeguards are met, certain of the other requirements of GDPR and the new DP Act apply in adapted form such as data rectification, storage limitation and initial notification of processing to data subjects.

This guide has been produced in partnership with National Records of Scotland, The Welsh Government, Public Record Office of Northern Ireland, Archives and Records Association (ARA) and National Archives, Ireland under independent chairmanship.

To see the guide, please visit Guide to archiving personal data

The post New guidelines for archiving personal data appeared first on The National Archives.

Updating our Statement of Public Task

Tue, 08/07/2018 - 11:42

The National Archives has published a revised version of our Statement of Public Task.

Statements of Public Task are a key part of the transparency requirement on public bodies under the law governing the re-use of public sector information. It is good practice for organisations to regularly review their Statement of Public Task. It is also important to publish the Statement of Public Task, for public scrutiny as well as comment and challenge.

John Sheridan, Digital Director at The National Archives, said:

‘In this update, we have taken the opportunity to clarify in more detail the basis on which we make digital surrogates available for re-use. A digital surrogate of a public record is a representation of that record, usually a photographic image, stored in digital form. Our revised Statement of Public Task makes it clear that digital surrogates are outside our public task where the digitisation has been funded by a third party, and the purpose of the digitisation was to widen access to the collection or to achieve a commercial return for The National Archives.’

If you have any comments about our revised Statement of Public Task, please contact us.

The post Updating our Statement of Public Task appeared first on The National Archives.

Updating our Statement of Public Task

Tue, 08/07/2018 - 11:42

The National Archives has published a revised version of our Statement of Public Task.

Statements of Public Task are a key part of the transparency requirement on public bodies under the law governing the re-use of public sector information. It is good practice for organisations to regularly review their Statement of Public Task. It is also important to publish the Statement of Public Task, for public scrutiny as well as comment and challenge.

John Sheridan, Digital Director at The National Archives, said:

‘In this update, we have taken the opportunity to clarify in more detail the basis on which we make digital surrogates available for re-use. A digital surrogate of a public record is a representation of that record, usually a photographic image, stored in digital form. Our revised Statement of Public Task makes it clear that digital surrogates are outside our public task where the digitisation has been funded by a third party, and the purpose of the digitisation was to widen access to the collection or to achieve a commercial return for The National Archives.’

If you have any comments about our revised Statement of Public Task, please contact us.

The post Updating our Statement of Public Task appeared first on The National Archives.

Archives Revealed awards first Scoping Grants

Tue, 08/07/2018 - 08:32

The first five successful applicants to the Archives Revealed Scoping Grants programme have been announced.

The scheme, which is supported by The National Archives, The Pilgrim Trust, the Wolfson Foundation and the Foyle Foundation, has awarded grants of up to £3,000 to five archives across the UK.

Val Johnson, Director of Research and Collections at The National Archives, said:

“The Scoping Grants scheme is designed to provide support for archives to improve the understanding and accessibility of their collections. We are delighted to announce the first five recipients from our new Scoping Grant programme, which will result in archives producing better plans for the development of collections, conducting robust preparation for further work on archive material, and opening up new research possibilities for the wider public.”

The first scoping grants have been awarded to Alexandra Park and Palace Charitable Trust, Society of Antiquaries of London, Morrab Library, Centre for Buckinghamshire Studies, and Leonard Cheshire. Further information about each scoping grant project.

The Scoping Grants scheme is a rolling programme with assessments taking place four times per year. Further details about the scheme.

The post Archives Revealed awards first Scoping Grants appeared first on The National Archives.

Archives Revealed awards first Scoping Grants

Tue, 08/07/2018 - 08:32

The first five successful applicants to the Archives Revealed Scoping Grants programme have been announced.

The scheme, which is supported by The National Archives, The Pilgrim Trust, the Wolfson Foundation and the Foyle Foundation, has awarded grants of up to £3,000 to five archives across the UK.

Val Johnson, Director of Research and Collections at The National Archives, said:

“The Scoping Grants scheme is designed to provide support for archives to improve the understanding and accessibility of their collections. We are delighted to announce the first five recipients from our new Scoping Grant programme, which will result in archives producing better plans for the development of collections, conducting robust preparation for further work on archive material, and opening up new research possibilities for the wider public.”

The first scoping grants have been awarded to Alexandra Park and Palace Charitable Trust, Society of Antiquaries of London, Morrab Library, Centre for Buckinghamshire Studies, and Leonard Cheshire. Further information about each scoping grant project.

The Scoping Grants scheme is a rolling programme with assessments taking place four times per year. Further details about the scheme.

The post Archives Revealed awards first Scoping Grants appeared first on The National Archives.

Maintenance work on our website, Sunday 5 August 08:00-12:00

Wed, 08/01/2018 - 11:40

We will be carrying out essential maintenance work from 08:00 to 12:00 on Sunday 5 August. We anticipate that all our online and web services will be disrupted during this time.

We expect the work to be completed by 12:00, when all our online services are scheduled to be available once more.

We apologise for any inconvenience caused.

The post Maintenance work on our website, Sunday 5 August 08:00-12:00 appeared first on The National Archives.

Newly accredited archive services

Tue, 07/24/2018 - 05:09

The UK Archive Service Accreditation Partnership is pleased to announce that a further 17 archive services have been awarded accredited status as a recent  Archive Service Accreditation Panel. The successful archive services are:

  • Bolton Archives and Local Studies Service
  • Bromley Archives
  • Bury Archives and Local History Service
  • Centre for Buckinghamshire Studies
  • Dudley Archives and Local History Service
  • Durham County Record Office
  • Essex Record Office
  • Kent Archive Service
  • North East Lincolnshire Archives
  • Northumberland Archives
  • Public Record Office of Northern Ireland
  • Stockport Local Heritage Library
  • Tameside Local Studies and Archives
  • Teesside Archives
  • University of Liverpool Library Special Collections and Archives
  • Wallace Collection
  • West Sussex Record Office

The archive services demonstrated that they have achieved UK national standards relating to management and resourcing; the care of unique collections and the service offer to their entire range of users.

See the full list of accredited archive services.

Find out more about Archive Service Accreditation.

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